Jewellery for sale in the Bealach Gallery

Exciting news, a selection of my jewellery will be for sale in the Bealach CafĂ© and Gallery up in the Scottish Highlands! Check out their facebook page too – it’s a beautiful place, and I hear very good things about the scones! I covet so many of the gorgeous paintings on the walls, and I hope the locals and passing traffic like my jewellery as much as the setting.

Pierced sterling silver brooches and pendants with hammered textures.

Crashing wave ring

My workshop is land-locked, but with a recording of waves lapping a pebbly shore and memories of sparkling waters in my mind, I’ve created this ring so one can carry the sea with them always.

Shaped to mimic surf breaking on a beach, it catches the eye but is low-profiled and comfortable for everyday wear.

etsy_button_smallest

Slender crashing wave ring

My workshop is land-locked, but with a recording of waves lapping a pebbly shore and memories of sparkling waters in my mind, I’ve created this ring so one can carry the sea with them always.

Shaped to mimic surf breaking on a beach, it catches the eye but is low-profiled and comfortable for everyday wear. The rest of the band echoes waves over deeper water.

UK size O (approx 7 1/2 US, 55 1/4 EU), but I can enlarge it by a size or two on request.

Hand-carved in wax then cast in solid sterling silver, and hand-finished.

etsy_button_smallest

Swinging copper discs in progress

Prototyping a new pair of earrings – swirly hardware and a lightly dished bright copper disc with a hammered texture. I’m delighted with how elegant, shimmery and eye-catching these turned out. I also feel my soldering has improved a great deal – not to mention that it’s great to have a second torch when you’re working on something just a little to big for one to handle alone. Unfortunately my camera’s away for repairs, so here are some dodgy phone pictures.

Mish’s silver stone-holding ‘hug’

I greeted the new year with a replacement setting for a friend’s ‘journey stone’ – a ‘hug’ rather than a cage. A total of 50cm of sterling wire spirals, gradually soldered into a cage to hold the stone, and finally closed securely by interleaving two of the spirals.