Deep Sea Mermaid Costume

A ‘Deep Sea Mermaid’ costume for a 20,000 leagues under the sea party. Hand-made high waisted fishtail dress with petticoats and glowing lateral lines and frills around the ‘tail’, head-dress with spines from behind ear and top of head, with glowing anglerfish style lure. Not pictured: a glowing jellyfish companion (umbrella). Much to my chagrin, we didn’t get photos of that, which is a pity as moved, flowed and pulsed beautifully, and really made the outfit.

Wireframe Top Hat

Four hours from an odd idea to something completely worthwhile: a wireframe top hat with crank-rod which drives the motion of flags at the end of long rods, held in position by a wire network on the top of the hat. Wire, tube, blowtorch, solder, pliers and snips. Very simple, straightforward and oh, so satisfying. A source of much glee.

Ram’s horns

I hope to find the making-of photos for these some day (and confirm creation date), but this is a lightweight pair of ridged, textured ram’s-style horns, mounted on a broad headband. Suitable for costumes including demons, tieflings, aliens, monsters, sheep (presumably), puck, satyrs, and Tim the Enchanter.

These started life as a cardboard box (or three), which was cut (with scissors) into 2 sets of 45 circles, each 0.5mm different in radius. Then I used the pair of compasses (spikes both ends) to pierce the centre and an extra hole, and created similarly pierced small squares to act as spacers.

Each of these sets was then threaded onto a doubled-over piece of wire, starting with the smallest and with cardboard spacers between. Once I was happy with the conical structure produced, I twisted them into matching spirals, attached them to big bits of card, and set to work with plaster-of-paris impregnated fabric – mod rock, I think it’s called? This stretched nicely over the splayed ridges of the cardboard (although the excess water did imperil the structural integrity of the ridges), and smooshed down into the grooves. Once two layers of that had set hard, I added another layer of plaster to conceal the fabric texture. Some tea to dull the brilliance, twisting the wire into the latticework of a broad plastic hair-band, and I had a truly epic pair of horns to wear around the place.

It’s surprisingly easy to style my hair to conceal the band, and they look very solidly rooted.

I’ve been using these at least a couple of times a year since I made them, and they’re comfortable and light enough to wear all night, although people will want a go with them :P They’ve borne up pretty well, but the plaster is flaking and the headband starting go give up.

Photo is a hungover ‘steampunk alien’ me, with ‘space nazi’ Scary.

Butterfly System

Film-making collective TortoiseButler’s entry into the 2011 London Science Fiction Festival 48 Hour Film Challenge.

The premis: given a title, line of dialogue and prop, go forth and brainstorm, write, script, storyboard, shot-plan, setup, shoot, edit, sound-design and… well, /everything/ a film up to 5 minutes long, within 48 hours.

As usual we were incredibly ambitious and tried to cover a huge amount of complex plot and world-building, but in this case while the outcome was stunningly beautiful, only one person has been able to ‘read’ the story from it that we were trying to convey.

My contributions included scouting the location (equipped with wellies, boilersuit and head-torch, I got to climb around in and UNDER the Kew Bridge Steam Museum), brainstorming, helping conceive the plot, and then props, costumes, sfx-makeup (detailed tattoos you mostly can’t see), set design, and learned to do digital SFX overnight.