Crashing wave ring

My workshop is land-locked, but with a recording of waves lapping a pebbly shore and memories of sparkling waters in my mind, I’ve created this ring so one can carry the sea with them always.

Shaped to mimic surf breaking on a beach, it catches the eye but is low-profiled and comfortable for everyday wear.

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Slender crashing wave ring

My workshop is land-locked, but with a recording of waves lapping a pebbly shore and memories of sparkling waters in my mind, I’ve created this ring so one can carry the sea with them always.

Shaped to mimic surf breaking on a beach, it catches the eye but is low-profiled and comfortable for everyday wear. The rest of the band echoes waves over deeper water.

UK size O (approx 7 1/2 US, 55 1/4 EU), but I can enlarge it by a size or two on request.

Hand-carved in wax then cast in solid sterling silver, and hand-finished.

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Perching bronze wren sculpture

I adore the way that wrens flit from perch to perch, pausing for an instant with tail up and wings slightly lowered. They haven’t visited my garden recently, so I sculpted this bright little thing to watch over my workbench.

Although its base is slightly hollowed out to ensure a stable and secure seat, it weighs about 60 grammes so would make a perfect paperweight for a twitcher or gardener.

Hand-carved in wax then cast in solid bronze, with a satin or mirror finish.

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Waxes and casting and metals, oh my!

More work in the new medium – wax carvings to be cast in metal, and some from my first batch, which I’d already received back from the casters. The dragon will turn into a belt buckle, the smaller version of the wave ring will be cast in sterling silver, and the little bird will be, I think, a little bronze statuette. There will also be copper ginko leaf buttons, barnacle and wave buttons, and a driftwood and barnacle ring. Phew!

Deep sea mermaid – version 2

This is an upgrade of my deep sea mermaid costume which I put together for a victoriana-inspired costumed club night a few years ago.
This version takes the original concept, but instead of the boiling hot corset, floor-length fishtail skirt with petticoat, and knee-high New Rock boots combo, I put together a matching outfit that was a bit more comfortable and cool.
I also went for a scarier tone, combining the anglerfish style glowing lure with thin thermoplastic teeth and boldly creepy face-paint – more suitable for a dark and noisy environment, and way more fun to wear. This is definitely a costume I’ll continue to develop, as my prop-making skills evolve. I will probably remake the glowing jellyfish umbrella some time too, because that was beyond awesome and I really miss it.

Lighting watercolours for photograpy

It’s always great borrowing someone else’s fancy kit; a friend was visiting with some £160 LED light boxes so I thought I’d have a go with using this technique for capturing watercolours or other drawings done on textured paper – something that I’ve struggled with in the past, especially when trying to create icons for websites. I was absolutely delighted with the results, now I just need to find some more reasonably-priced lights that will achieve the same results.

BBC R&D project at the Commonwealth Games – video overlay

BBC R&D have a cool project called IP Studio, which is looking to ditch the direct wiring of live sound and video equipment, and allow programmes to be produced using all the flexibility the internet has to offer. The technology was showcased using a super-high-definition broadcast of coverage from the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, via a sound desk and presenter in London.

This short video of interviews with IP Studio team members was produced by Alia Sheikh, and shows in their own words why they think that this is an important and exciting project.

I was tasked with enhancing the impact and clarity of key points. Once I received a cut of the interviews, I had a few days to transcribe the contents, plan and produce animated overlays. I created a distillation of the interviewees’ words, then manipulating the layout and timing with which they appeared to echo the speakers visually. With the addition of a few basic animated diagrams, the overlay was added to an Ultra High Definition version of the interviews, and become one of the first pieces to be broadcast at this resolution.

It was fantastic project to work on – self-contained, with very tight deadlines, but incorporating elements of technical communications, layout and animation design. I was delighted to get great feedback from the folks at the BBC involved.

Watch the video over on the BBC R&D blog here.